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Introduction
Preparation and Planning
Financial Management
Construction Process
Regulatory and Compliance
Post-Construction Management
Land and Site Considerations
Team and Project Management
Utility and Infrastructure Planning
Resource and Materials

01.
 
How to Use the Step Guides
02.
 
Understanding Your Reasons for Building
03.
 
Key Things To Factor When Building
04.
 
Site Analysis and Pre-Design Assessment in New Home Construction
05.
 
Researching the Building Process
06.
 
Using the Simpli Portal for Building Consent and Compliance
07.
 
Setting a Preliminary Budget
08.
 
Choosing the Best Hardware Store for Your New Build
09.
 
Land Ownership Types in New Zealand
10.
 
Maximising Cash Flow in Construction
11.
 
Cost Components of a New Build
12.
 
Land Terrain Types and Their Influence on Building

13.
 
Environmental Impact Assessment in New Home Construction
14.
 
Matching Property Types to Your Land Choice
15.
 
Deciding on the Type of House to Suit Your Land and Project
16.
 
Architectural Considerations and Planning Permissions
17.
 
Choosing the Right Builder
18.
 
Assembling the Right Team
19.
 
New Build Project Management Tools
20.
 
Building Contract Guide for Clients
21.
 
Due Diligence and Contracts in Building Projects
22.
 
Change Order Management in Construction Projects
23.
 
Financing Strategies for New Build Homes
24.
 
Progressing Planning and Designing
25.
 
Design Principles for Your New Home Build
26.
 
On-grid vs. Off-grid Living
27.
 
Foundation Types for New Zealand New Builds
28.
 
External Cladding Options for New Zealand Homes
29.
 
Interior Cladding Options for New Zealand Homes
30.
 
Flooring Options for New Zealand Homes
31.
 
Utility Connection Planning
32.
 
Finalising Your New Build Construction Plans
33.
 
Key Consents for New Build Projects
34.
 
Finalising Detailed Architectural Plans and Building Specifications
35.
 
Recheck and Reforecast Your Build Costs
36.
 
Regular Financial Audits
37.
 
Keeping a Debits and Credits Log for Construction Expenses
38.
 
Construction Phase Contingency Planning
39.
 
Effective Risk Management Strategies in Construction Projects
40.
 
Breaking Ground on The New Build
41.
 
Essential Construction Material Order Timings for New Builds
42.
 
Site Visits for Building Inspections and Material Delivery
43.
 
Understanding Milestone Payments in Construction Projects
44.
 
Laying Foundations and Frameworks
45.
 
Security and Site Management During Construction
46.
 
Installing Roof Stage
47.
 
Quality Control Checks During Construction
48.
 
Installing Windows and Doors Stage
49.
 
Preparation and Treatment of Exterior Cladding Materials
50.
 
Installing Exterior Cladding
51.
 
Completing Electrical Pre-Wire
52.
 
Completing Plumbing Pre-installation
53.
 
Completing Insulation Installation
54.
 
Preparation and Treatment of Interior Cladding Materials
55.
 
Installing Interior Cladding
56.
 
Post Installation Interior Wall Preparation and Treatment
57.
 
Post Interior Cladding Installation Cleaning
58.
 
Installation of Flooring in New Home Construction
59.
 
Installation of Kitchen in New Home Construction
60.
 
Installation of Bathroom and Toilet in New Home Construction
61.
 
Installing Fixtures and Fittings in New Home Construction
62.
 
Final Electrical Fit Out in New Home Construction
63.
 
Final Plumbing and Gas Fit Out in New Home Construction
64.
 
Installation of a Deck in New Home Construction
65.
 
Final Cleaning and Detailing
66.
 
Installation of Window Treatments in New Home Construction
67.
 
Final Inspection and Certifications for New Home Construction
68.
 
Practical Completion and Handover to Homeowner in New Home Construction
69.
 
Post-Construction Reviews
70.
 
Financial Planning for Long-Term Property Maintenance
71.
 
Post-Construction Warranty and Maintenance Information
72.
 
Community and Neighbourhood Integration
73.
 
Planning for Sustainability in Your New Home
74.
 
Home Enhancement and Upgrades
75.
 
Resale Preparation and Valuation

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Build / Step 12 of 75

Land Terrain Types and Their Influence on Building

Land Terrain Types and Their Influence on Building


In the process of choosing land for building in New Zealand, it's crucial to understand how the type of terrain not only impacts the initial land cost but also significantly influences the overall budget and design possibilities of your project. This summary step delves into various land types, offering insights into their pros and cons, to help you make an informed decision that aligns with your financial and lifestyle goals. This step is expanded further in the full article here: 

Proximity (Urban, Suburban, Rural)

Choosing between urban, suburban, and rural settings is a significant decision that affects not just the lifestyle you're seeking but also your building budget and project timeline. Urban areas offer unparalleled access to amenities and services, making them ideal for those seeking convenience and an active lifestyle, though at a higher land cost and with potential privacy concerns. Suburban settings strike a balance between urban accessibility and the tranquility of more spacious living environments, often at more affordable land prices but possibly with higher costs in sought-after locations. Rural locations provide privacy, space, and a closer connection to nature, typically at lower land costs, but with the trade-off of increased travel times for amenities and potentially higher costs for extending services to remote sites. Some areas (mainly newer areas though) have design covenants in place such as limiting exterior colours, materials, fencing heights, etc., as developers try to create a cohesive image across the suburb/area.

Site State (Clear, Bush Clad)

The state of the site, whether clear or bush-clad, impacts both the aesthetic appeal and the complexity of your building project. Clear sites offer a blank canvas for construction, potentially lowering initial land preparation costs but may lack the natural beauty and privacy offered by vegetation. Bush-clad sites provide a unique opportunity to integrate natural landscapes into your design, offering privacy and aesthetic appeal, but require careful planning to navigate environmental protection laws and potentially higher costs for land clearing and management. When considering a bush-clad site, it's important to factor in additional budget considerations for environmental assessments and compliance with local regulations.

If you are clearing bush/trees, make sure none of the trees you are cutting down are protected.

From Auckland Council Website: If a tree on your property is protected, you will need resource consent to remove it, prune it, or carry out construction work near it. It's best to check with us before you start any work on or near a tree, so we can provide up-to-date information on all the rules which may apply.
Gradient (Flat, Mixed, Sloped)

The gradient of your site significantly influences design possibilities, construction complexity, and overall project costs. Flat sites are generally easier and less costly to build on, offering more straightforward access and reducing the need for extensive ground preparation. However, they may lack the distinctive views and architectural opportunities presented by sloped or mixed-gradient sites. Sloped sites allow for creative design and stunning views but come with higher construction costs due to the need for specialised foundation work, retaining walls, and water management systems. Mixed-gradient sites offer a compromise, providing some of the benefits of both flat and sloped terrains but require careful planning to maximise the advantages of the varied landscape. When budgeting for a sloped or mixed-gradient site, anticipate additional costs for engineering services and potentially more complex construction techniques.